Consultation on proposals for the First-tier Tribunal (Immigration and Asylum Chamber) and Upper Tribunal (Immigration and Asylum Chamber) fees

Closed 3 Jun 2016

Opened 21 Apr 2016

Results Updated 15 Sep 2016

The government has today (15 September 2016) published its response to the consultation on proposals to reform the fees charged in the Immigration and Asylum Chamber of the First-tier Tribunal and Upper Tribunal.

The consultation paper was published on 21 April 2016 and the closed on 3 June 2016.

The response announces our intention to:

  • increasing the fee payable for an application to the First-tier Tribunal (Immigration and Asylum Chamber) for a decision on the papers from £80 to £490;
  • increasing the fee payable for an application to the First-tier Tribunal (Immigration and Asylum Chamber) for an oral hearing from £140 to £800;
  • introducing a fee of £455 for an application to the First-tier Tribunal for permission to appeal to the Upper Tribunal;
  • introducing a fee of £350 for an application to the Upper Tribunal for permission to appeal in that Tribunal (where the application to the First-tier Tribunal has been refused);  
  • introducing an appeal fee in the Upper Tribunal of £510; and
  • extensions to the existing exemptions and remissions scheme that applies in the First-tier Tribunal and on whether the same scheme should apply in the Upper Tribunal. 

Files:

Overview

This consultation sets out the government’s proposals for charging fees in the First-tier Tribunal (Immigration and Asylum Chamber) and the Upper Tribunal (Immigration and Asylum Chamber) at full cost recovery levels. To achieve this we are proposing increasing the fees currently charged in the First-tier Tribunal and the introduction of fees for permission to appeal applications and for appeals heard in the Upper Tribunal.  Alongside the fee increases the consultation also seeks views on a possible extension to the current system of fee exemptions.

Courts and tribunals fulfil a vital role in an effective and functioning democracy. They provide access to justice for those who need it, upholding the principle of the rule of law that underpins our society, and indeed our economy. That is why we must make sure that our courts and tribunals are properly funded. This Government announced in the Autumn Statement that it would be making an historic investment of £700 million to reform Her Majesty’s Courts & Tribunals Service over the next five years. This crucial investment will allow us to modernise and improve the service we provide to the public.

At the same time, we are committed to reducing public spending and continue the work to mend the economy. It is fair that a greater proportion of the costs of our courts and tribunals is borne by those who directly benefit from using them.

Audiences

  • Citizens
  • Voluntary organisations
  • Local authorities
  • Government departments
  • Legal professionals
  • Judiciary
  • Immigration removal centre staff
  • Court & Tribunal staff
  • Legal professional bodies
  • UK policy institutions

Interests

  • Courts
  • Law
  • Access to justice
  • Equality & diversity
  • UK Law